Blood Pressure

 
Know Your 5
Want to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and other serious illnesses? Know your 5.
 
Keep up with your five key health indicators — blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, body mass index (BMI) and weight — to improve your health. Knowing your 5 can even control or prevent diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. Get Healthy, Live Well's evidence-based wellness programs can help you keep track of your numbers.
 
Click here to find and register for classes in Carroll, Haralson and Heard counties or call 770.214.CARE (2273).
3 Ways to Reduce Your Risk for a Heart Attack
Whatever your age, it’s never too late to start reducing your risk for a heart attack. Timothy Albert, MD, tells you how.
 
Learn more >
Registration Open for Tanner’s Living Well Workshop
Do you or someone you know live with an ongoing health problem? There are ways to gain control of symptoms and live a better, healthier life. Tanner Health System’s Get Healthy, Live Well is offering a free, six-session Living Well Workshop to help participants and caregivers manage any health condition.
 
Learn more >
3 Ways to Reduce Your Risk for a Heart Attack
Whatever your age, it’s never too late to start reducing your risk for a heart attack. Timothy Albert, MD, tells you how.
 
Learn more >
 

 

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Blood Pressure

There's good news and bad news from a new report when it comes to high blood pressure among America's children.

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Blood Pressure

A startling 75 percent of black people in the United States develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, a new study finds.

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Blood Pressure

Here's yet another reason to get your blood pressure under control: High blood pressure later in life may contribute to blood vessel blockages and tangles linked to Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

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Blood Pressure

Elevated blood pressure in your 50s might raise your risk of developing dementia later in life, a new European study has found.

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Blood Pressure

One out of every three U.S. adults has high blood pressure that should be treated with medication, under guidelines recently adopted by the two leading heart health associations.

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