Depression

Mental Health and Substance Abuse Hotlines and Resources
Willowbrooke at Tanner offers free, confidential mental health screenings for adults, adolescents and children with behavioral, emotional and substance abuse problems, including depression, suicidal thoughts, treatment for alcohol abuse, drug abuse, addiction, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and schizophrenia.

For more information or to schedule a confidential mental health or substance abuse screening, please call our 24-hour helpline at 770-812-9551.

Learn more >
Mental Health and Substance Abuse Hotlines and Resources
Need help? The following link provides a list of 24-hour crisis intervention hotlines, videos and other resources.

Get help now >
Exercise Your Mind: Sign Up for Our Mindfulness Meditation Series
When it comes to overall wellness, it’s important to be mindful and fully present for ourselves and others. Mindfulness Meditation, a program offered by Get Healthy, Live Well, brings your body, mind and heart into harmony.
 
Register now >
Weather Life's Storms
People vary in their ability to handle setbacks. Those who possess resilience adapt well to adversity. Those who lack it, however, struggle to cope with stress and strife.
 
Learn more >
Read more

Can You Beat the Blues With 'Downward Dog'?

THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2019 -- New evidence bolsters the belief that yoga can offer real and lasting relief to people with depression.

Dr. Chris Streeter, a psychiatrist at Boston University's School of Medicine, said the new study she led builds on earlier work showing a correlation between yoga and levels of GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid), a chemical in the brain. Yoga seems to raise GABA levels, much as anti-depression and anti-anxiety drugs do, she explained.

Read more

Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 6, 2019 -- Getting more exercise could help ward off depression, even if you have a genetic risk for it, new research shows.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from nearly 8,000 people and found that those with a genetic predisposition were more likely to be diagnosed with depression over the next two years.

Read more
Read more